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Review: The May Bride by Suzannah Dunn

The royal families of England have always been intriguing to readers, and many authors have capitalized on creating stories based on those families and their scandalous lives. None have provided as much fodder as Henry VIII and...

Broken Homes & Gardens by Rebecca Kelley

Rebecca Kelley teaches writing at the Oregon College of Art & Craft and lives in Portland with her husband and daughter. She is also the co-author of The Eco-nomical Baby Guide. Broken Homes & Gardens is her first novel...

Review: Enchantment Lake by Margi Preus

Adolescence is the time in our lives when we search. We have to uncover who we are and who we want to be. YA literature often approaches this topic in a more symbolic than literal manner. Young characters go on physical quests ...

Review: The World Before Us, Aislinn Hunter

Aislinn Hunter’s The World Before Us is like a cross between A.S. Byatt’s Possession and Adam Foulds’s The Quickening Maze. I was drawn to the Victorian setting and the dual story line, contrasting the mysteries of an 1870s men...

Review: What Comes Next and How to Like It

Abigail Thomas writes a particular type of episodic memoir, in which chapters are often just a few sentences or paragraphs long. Safekeeping is the best example of her style, while A Three Dog Life is her best overall. I would ...

Review: Publishing by Gail Godwin

I had only heard of one Gail Godwin novel – Flora, her most recent – before I spotted this memoir on NetGalley. It turns out she’s the author of 14 novels, two short story collections, and a few nonfiction works, and was a fina...

Review: The Bohemians, Ben Tarnoff

Ben Tarnoff’s book The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers who Reinvented American Literature offers a fresh look at four authors who came into their own during San Francisco’s burgeoning 1860s. The ...

Review: The Fever by Megan Abbott

High school provides all the drama. Classrooms and hallways house gossip, proclamations of sex, and scandals. Secrets spill from tightly sealed lips, and loyalties break in an instant. When you think about it, isn’t a high scho...

Review: Aquarium by David Vann

I’ve been a huge fan of David Vann’s fiction ever since I read Caribou Island in 2011, so news of a new book from him is a big deal for me. His new novel, Aquarium, doesn’t release until March 2015, but I jumped at the chance t...
 
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Review: Nora Webster by Colm Tóibín

Nora Webster by Colm Tóibín, his eighth novel, is a subtle portrait of a bereaved family in late 1960s Ireland. Nora, 40, has lost her husband Maurice to sudden illness. Repressing her own grief, she helps her four children mov...

Review: California by Edan Lepucki

Creating an apocalyptic U.S. seems to be the going trend in contemporary American literature. Some of the greats have already given their contribution to the genre. Cormac McCarthy did it so beautifully in The Road. Colson Whit...

Review: The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd

There was a time in Africa the people could fly. Mauma told me this one night when I was ten years old. She said, ‘Handful, your granny-mauma saw it for herself. She say they flew over trees and clouds. She say they flew like b...

Review: The Cure by Douglas E. Richards

Who are the good guys? Douglas E Richards has an amazing talent at keeping the reader guessing.

Review: The Enchanted by Rene Denfeld

“This is an enchanted place. Others don’t see it but I do.”   Magic exists as an optimistic escape from the horrors of reality. The fantastical, no matter how enchanting, isn’t always enough to transport us completely away...

Review: Friendship by Emily Gould

For your summer reading pleasure, here’s a perfect book to take to the beach, on the train, or to the doctor’s office: Friendship by Emily Gould. It’s just right if you’re a 30-year-old woman, like me and like Gould’s main char...